The expected maximum processing time is

3 months

Who can be granted a convention or alien’s passport?
What are the requirements?
What does a passport cost?
Travel restrictions for refugees
School trips without passport

Who can be granted a convention or alien’s passport?

Foreign nationals residing in Denmark will normally hold a national passport. National passports are renewed by the diplomatic mission (embassy or consulate general) of the country that issued it. The embassy may be situated either in Denmark or in another country.

Some foreign nationals cannot obtain a passport from the authorities in the country of which they are a citizen.

If you hold a Danish residence permit as a refugee you cannot be required to apply for a passport from the authorities in the country of which you are a citizen. Instead, you can be issued a passport by the Danish authorities.

If you hold a Danish residence permit and are recognised as stateless in accordance with the United Nations Convention of 28 September 1954 relating to the Status of Stateless Persons, you are entitled to an alien’s passport, which states that the holder has been recognised as stateless in accordance with the convention.

The Immigration Service can also issue an alien’s passport to foreign nationals who hold a Danish residence permit, for example, as a family-reunified person, if the authorities in the country of which they are a citizen will not issue a national passport.

There are two types of passports issued to foreign nationals:

  • A Danish travel document (convention passport)
  • An alien's passport
     

What are the requirements?

The requirements you need to meet in order to qualify for an alien’s passport depend on the type of passport you are applying for.

You can be issued a Danish travel document if you hold a Danish residence permit as a refugee, as defined in the United Nations Refugee Convention of 28 July 1951.

This means that if you have been granted a residence permit under the terms of Aliens Act section 7 (1) or section 8 (1), you can be issued a Danish travel document.

In some cases, you can be issued a Danish travel document if you were initially granted a residence permit on the grounds of asylum in another country, but you were later granted a residence permit in Denmark on another ground, such as family reunification.

 

You can be granted an alien’s passport if you:

  • Hold refugee status (protected status) under the terms of Aliens Act section 7 (2), section 7 (3) or section 8 (2), or have been granted a residence permit under the terms of Aliens Act section 8 (3)
  • Hold a Danish residence permit and you were recognised as stateless in accordance with the United Nations Convention of 28 September 1954 relating to the Status of Stateless Persons, and stating that you are recognised as stateless in accordance with the convention. This also applies to stateless children
  • Have been issued a residence permit in accordance with Aliens Act section 9 (1) (ii), if one of your parents holds a residence permit in Denmark as a refugee. The rule applies regardless of whether you are a minor child
  • Hold a residence permit as an unaccompanied minor
  • Hold a residence permit, for example as a family-reunified person, and can prove you cannot get a national passport issued from the authorities in the country of which you are a citizen. You can document your inability to obtain a passport by providing a declaration from your home country stating that they  will not issue you a national passport, regardless of whether the they acknowledges that you are Citizen
     

What does a passport cost?

The fee for obtaining a new passport depends on your age. If you are:

  • 65 years or older, the fee is DKK 376
  • 18-64 years old, the fee is DKK 626
  • 12-17 years old, the fee is DKK 141
  • 11 years or younger, the fee is DKK 115

The fee musat be paid in person to the Immigration Service or the police.

If you are not issued a passport, the fee will be returned to you.

Travel restrictions for refugees

If you have been granted refugee status in Denmark, your passport will state that it is invalid for travel to your home country or the country where you risk persecution. You can apply to the Immigration Service to have this travel restriction revoked.

Read more about travel restrictions for refugees
 

School trips without passport

Children holding a residence permit in Denmark who would like to go on a school trip to another EU country will normally be able to travel without a passport, provided they are registered on the school’s travel list.

Read more about school travel lists
 

The information below explains what you need to do when you apply for a passport for foreign nationals. 

You need to complete the application. You also need to enclose documentation, so it is a good idea to gather it all before you start.  

You may need:

Set aside

15 to 20 minutes

to fill in the application form

1 person

You, the applicant, need to fill in the application form.

The application form includes detailed instructions for how to fill it in and which types of documentation you need to enclose. If you are a child under the age of 16, your custody holder needs to submit the application.

You need a NemID code card when filling in the application form. Read more about NemID

If you want to resume filling in an application form online select ‘Start online application’. Once you are logged in, select ‘Continue a previously saved application’.

If you would like to make changes to an online application after you have submitted it, you need to contact the Immigration Service. You do not need to submit a new application. Contact the Immigration Service 

Start PA1-2 online application

You are required to use the online version of application form PA1-2 when applying for a passport for foreign nationals, unless you have been granted an exemption. Read more about mandatory online self-service
 

After you submit your on-line application, you need to appear in person at the Immigration Service’s Citizen Service. If you live outside Greater Copenhagen, you can also have your biometric features recorded at certain police stations. See the list of police stations capable of recording biometric features  

Remember to bring an approved passport photo. See overview of requirements for passport photos (in Danish only)

When you appear at the Immigration Service’s Citizen Service or at a police station, you will need to pay the application fee and sign an information card.

You will also need to have your fingerprints (biometric features) recorded for storage on a microchip in your passport.

Your fingerprints will be saved for up to 90 days. This means that you will need to have your fingerprints recorded again if your passport is issued more than 90 days after they were recorded. This could be the case if you are applying for a new passport at the same time as you are applying for an extension of your residence permit or a permanent residence permit. In this situation, your passport application will only be processed once your residence permit has been extended, or you have been granted a permanent residence permit, which normally takes more than 90 days.

The Immigration Service will ask you to have your fingerprints recorded again if it is necessary.
 

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