The expected maximum processing time is
8 months

The fee (work or study) is:
DKK 6,960,-

The fee (others) is:
DKK 4,930,-

Who can be granted a permanent residence permit?

What are the requirements?

Who can be granted an exemption from the requirements?

When can you apply for a permanent residence permit?

Who can be granted a permanent residence permit?

You can be granted a permanent residence permit in Denmark once you have had a temporary residence permit for eight years. In some cases the requirement is four years.

You need to meet certain requirements.

Lenient requirements apply if you are:

 

What are the requirements?

In order to qualify for a permanent residence permit, you, the applicant, need to meet a number of basic requirements. You also need to meet at least two of four supplementary requirements. If you meet all four supplementary requirements, you will qualify for a permanent residence permit after having resided legally in Denmark for four years, rather than the normal eight.

Basic requirements

You need to meet all the basic requirements in order to qualify for a permanent residence permit.
 

You need to be over the age of 18 in order to qualify for a permanent residence permit.  

You still need to meet the continuous requirements for your current residence permit.

In addition, you need to be a resident in Denmark at the time the Immigration Service reaches a decision about your application for a permanent residence permit. This requirement means, for example, that if you are working abroad for your Danish employer, or have departed Denmark, you need to return to Denmark in order to qualify for a permanent residence permit.

If you are applying for permanent residence permit as a family-reunified spouse, your spouse/partner in Denmark needs to meet some of the continuous requirements for qualifying as your sponsor. Your spouse/partner in Denmark also needs to complete part of the application form.
 

You need to have resided in Denmark legally for 8 years or more. During the entire period, you need to have had a residence permit issued under the terms of Aliens Act sections 7-9 f, sections 9 i-9 n or section 9 p (residence permit granted on the grounds of family reunification, asylum, studies or work etc.).

Your current residence permit states which section of the Aliens Act applies to your situation.

In some cases, you can qualify for a permanent residence permit after 4 years as a legal resident in Denmark.

8 years’ legal residence

One of the basic requirements for permanent residence is that you have been a legal resident in Denmark for at least 8 years at the time the Immigration Service reaches a decision about your application for permanent residence.

4 years’ legal residence

If, in addition to the basic requirements for a permanent residence permit, you also meet all 4 supplementary requirements, you can qualify for a permanent residence permit after having lived legally in Denmark for 4 years at the time the Immigration Service reaches a decision about your application for permanent residence.

One or more grounds for residence

One way to meet the 8-year residence requirement (in some cases 4-year) is by holding the same residence permit (such as one based on family reunification) for the entire period.

You can also meet the requirement if you have had multiple residence permits during your period of residence. This would be the case if you were initially granted a residence permit as an au pair, and then as a family-reunified spouse.

However, you are not permitted to combine periods of residence based on multiple relationships (spouses and/or cohabiting partners). If you have had multiple spouses or cohabiting partners, you will need to live with your current spouse/partner for 8 years (in some cases 4 years) before you qualify for permanent residence.

If you remarry or enter into a new relationship with a cohabiting partner after divorcing and are granted a new residence permit on the basis of the new relationship, your period of legal residence starts anew.

Read more about how the 8-year (in some cases 4-year) residence requirement is calculated

You may not have been convicted of certain crimes.

If you were sentenced to less than six months’ incarceration, or if the sentence was suspended, you will be temporarily ineligible for a permanent residence permit.

If you were sentenced to more than six months’ incarceration, you are permanently ineligible for a permanent residence permit.

The list below provides an overview of certain types of sentences and how they affect your eligibility for permanent residence:

  • Suspended custodial sentence without terms about community service leads to a 6-year penalty period starting from the time the final verdict is given
  • Suspended custodial sentence with terms about community service leads to a 7-year and 6 months penalty period starting from the time the final verdict is given.
  • Mandatory custodial sentence of less than 60 days leads to a 12-year penalty period starting from the time of release.
  • Mandatory custodial sentence of less than 60 days for violations of part 12 or part 13 of the Danish criminal code leads to a 18-year penalty period starting from the time of release.
  • Mandatory custodial sentence of 60 days or more, but less than 6 months leads to a 15-year penalty period starting from the time of release.
  • Mandatory prison sentence of at least 6 months leads to being barred from being granted a permanent residence permit in Denmark. This applies to all types of crime.
  • Mandatory prison sentence of at least 60 days for violations of part 12 of the Danish criminal code (crimes against the independence and security of the state) or part 13 of the Danish criminal code (crimes against the constitution of the state and the higher state authorities, terrorism, etc.) or sections 210, 216, 222-224, section 225 cf. section 226, or sections 243-246 of the provisions of the Danish criminal code (specific crimes concerning family affairs, sexual offence and crimes of violence) leads to being barred from being granted a permanent residence permit in Denmark.
  • Sentence for working illegally in the country in accordance with Section 59 of the Aliens Act leadswhen the person don’t have a residence permit in this country, to a 15-year penalty period, if subsequent offence 22 years and 6 months. The penalty period starts from the time of parole, the date of delivery of the final judgment, date of the parole’s expiration or date of the agreement on the fine, depending on which date entails the latest expiration of the penalty period.
  • Sentence for working illegally in the country in accordance with Section 59 of the Aliens Act leads, when the person has a residence permit in this country, for a subsequent offence to a 7-year penalty period. The penalty period starts from the time of parole, the date of delivery of the final judgment, date of the parole’s expiration or date of the agreement on the fine, depending on which date entails the latest expiration of the penalty period.
  • Youth sanction leads to a 6-year penalty period starting from the time of termination of the measure.
  • A sentence to be placed in an ambulatory psychiatric treatment with possible hospitalization in accordance to part 68 or part 69 of the Danish criminal code leads to a 6-year penalty period starting from the time of termination of the measure. However, at least 9 years must pass from the date the final measure is given by the court.
  • A sentence to be placed in psychiatric treatment in accordance to part 68 or part 69 of the Danish criminal code leads to a 9-year penalty period starting from the time of termination of the measure. However, at least 12 years must pass from the date the final measure is given by the court.
  • A sentence to be committed to a mental hospital leads to a 12-year penalty period starting from the time of termination of the measure. However, at least 15 years must pass from the date the final measure is given by the court.
  • A sentence to be placed in secure detention leads to a 30-year penalty period starting from the time of termination of the measure.

 

You may not have any overdue public debts. A debt is considered overdue if the public is entitled to payment of the debt, or if the amount due has not been repaid by the due date.

The following types of debt are those that are considered public debt. If you have overdue payments for any of the types of debt below, you cannot qualify for a permanent residence permit (conlusive list):

  • Social Service Act or Active Social Policy Act benefits that you are required by law to repay (such as overpaid social benefits)
  • Child support paid in advance
  • Day-care payment
  • Overpaid housing benefits
  • Housing-subsidy loan 
  • Taxes and levies, unless the amount in arrears is due to circumstances beyond your control

Other debts, such as student loans, bank loans or loans from a building society are not considered public debts and will not disqualify you from being granted a permanent residence permit.

Payment extension

You can still be granted a permanent residence permit if you have been granted an extension to repay outstanding debt. However, the amount you owe may not exceed DKK 118,450.13 (2019 level).

Being granted an extension means that the creditor (the state or municipality) has given the debtor (you) permission to postpone repayment of your debt until beyond the original due date. For example, SKAT, the Danish customs and tax administration, may award you an extension.

If you are uncertain whether you have been granted a payment extension, contact your municipality, SKAT or Udbetaling Danmark.

Repayment schedule

You cannot be granted a permanent residence permit if you have overdue public debts, even if you have been allowed to repay your debt in set number of instalments (also known as a repayment schedule).

If you have a repayment schedule, the state or municipality has agreed to let you pay back your debt in instalments, rather than as a lump sum. For example, you may agree to pay DKK 500 per month for three years.

If you repay your debt

If you repay an overdue public debt after you submit your application, but before the Immigration Service issues reaches a decision, you need to provide documentation showing you no longer have any public debt.

In order to qualify for a permanent residence permit you may not have received certain forms of social benefits within four years of applying for a permanent residence permit. Nor may you receive them until the time when the permanent residence permit is granted.

The decisive factor when evaluating whether you have received social benefits is whether they have been awarded under the terms of the Active Social Policy Act (lov om aktiv socialpolitik) or the Integration Act (integrationsloven). If you have received social benefits under the terms of either law, you can normally only be granted a permanent residence permit four years after the date you received your final benefit payment.

Example: if you received cash benefits until 1 July 2014, you would first meet this requirement on 1 July 2018. However, some benefits do not affect your eligibility for permanent residence.

Read more about the types of benefits that affect your eligibility for permanent residence

Supplementary cash benefits

If your spouse/partner received cash benefits, you may have received supplementary social security during the same period. As a result, you need to be aware of whether he/she received social security at any time in the four years before you submitted your application, or while your application is being processed.

If your spouse/partner received cash benefits, you may have received supplementary social security during the same period. This could result in your application being refused. If you are uncertain whether you have received, or will receive, supplementary cash benefits, contact your municipality.

 You need to accept a declaration of residence and self-support

The declaration is included in the online application and in the printable application form.

The declaration of declaration of residence and self-support is also available on the website of the Ministry of Immigration and Integration (site in Danish only)

You need to be employed at the time the Immigration Service reaches a decision about your application for a permanent residence permit.

You meet this requirement if, at the time the Immigration Service reaches a decision about your application for a permanent residence permit, you:

  • are employed in a non-terminated, permanent position
  • can prove that you will continue to be employed (for example, if you employed in a non-terminated, temporary position but there is still a significant amount of time before the position ends), or
  • are self-employed

Example: You are employed in a temporary position that is about to expire, but you can prove that you will continue to be working by providing a new employment contract or a statement from your employer stating that they expect to extend your position.

Your current position does not need to be full-time, provided you meet the other employment requirements. However, you need to work at least 15 hours per week.

Read more about the work requirement

You will not be considered employed if, at the time the Immigration Service reaches a decision about your application for a permanent residence permit, you:

  • Are employed in a position with wage subsidies (løntilskud)
  • Perform unpaid Work
  • Are enrolled in an educational programme, including internships or other forms of work that are a part of the programme
  • Work as a substitute hired through a temporary-employment agency
  • Work fewer than 15 hours per week
  • Work for a company that is in the process of liquidation, compulsory dissolution, announced suspension of payments or has been declared bankrupt, or
  • Are self-employed and your company is in the process of liquidation, compulsory dissolution, announced suspension of payments or has been declared bankrupt

 

You may not have worked deliberately against the establishment of your identity in connection with your application for residence permit or extension of your residence permit.

This requirement applies if you have submitted your first time application for residence permit 1 January 2018 or later.

You can for example be considered to have worked against the establishment of your identity, if you have presented falsified identity documents including a passport or a birth certificate, or if you have presented another person’s identity document.

It can also be the case if you have given untrue information about your name, your date of birth, your country of birth or your citizenship, and these conditions later in the processing of the case is being clarified either by you or the immigration authorities through control questions, tests, investigations etc.

If very special reasons apply you can be granted a permanent residence permit even though you have worked against the establishment of your identity.
 

You need to pass the Danish language test 2 (Prøve i Dansk 2), or a Danish exam of an equivalent or higher level.

List of Danish language tests that are equivalent to or higher than the Danish language test 2:

  • Danskuddannelsernes Prøve i Dansk 2 (with an average score of 6 or higher on the Danish 13-point scale, or 02 on the Danish seven-point scale)
  • FVU reading exam (level 2 or 3)
  • Any exam considered to be of an equivalent or higher level than Prøve i Dansk 3

Supplementary requirement – Danish language test 3

You can meet 1 of the 4 supplementary requirements by passing the Danish language test 3 (Prøve i Dansk 3), or a Danish exam of an equivalent or higher level.

Read more about the supplementary requirements and see list of Danish tests that are equivalent to or represent a higher level than Prøve i Dansk 3

In order to qualify for a permanent residence permit, you need to have had regular, full-time employment or been self-employed in Denmark for at least 3 years and 6 months during the 4 years prior to the date the Immigration Service reaches a decision about your application for permanent residence.

This means that during the past 4 years you need to have had regular, full-time employment for at least 3 years and 6 months in total.

You do not need to have been employed continuously for 3 years and 6 months. You could, for example, have worked full-time for a year, been unemployed for 6 months, and then have worked full-time again for 2 years and 6 months.

What is regular, full-time employment?

Regular employment should be understood to mean that your employer does not receive public funding, such as wage subsidies (løntilskud), in connection with your employment. Your pay and working conditions should also meet the level established in the applicable collective-bargaining agreement, or otherwise be considered normal for the position.

Full-time employment should be understood to mean minimum 30 hours per week, or minimum 120 hours per month.

If you worked more than one job at a time and your combined total number of hours 30 hours per week, or 120 hours per month, you meet the regular, full-time employment requirement.

The following types of employment are considered regular employment

  • Paid employment, minimum 30 hours per week, or 120 hours per month
  • Work as a self-employed if the work carries the same weight as a regular full-time employment
  • Working for a business owned by your spouse, if the work is taxable and can be considered regular, full-time employment
  • Sick leave, holiday, absence to care for family members and parental leave etc, within the terms and conditions of your employment
  • Flexjob – If it meets the terms established by the Active Employment Policy Act (lov om en aktiv beskæftigelsesindsats), a flexjob is considered regular employment, even though the employer may have received a subsidy to pay your wages. A flexjob counts as full-time employment regardless of the number of hours you worked

The following types of employment are not considered regular employment:

  • Benefits paid during periods of unemployment (including arbejdsløshedsdagpenge)
  • Unpaid Work
  • Positions for which your employer received public funding, such as wage subsidies (løntilskud)
  • Employment in job rotation
  • Education, including internships or other forms of work that are a part of the programme
  • Periods of employment during which you worked for less than 30 hours per week

Read more about which types of employment can be considered regular, full-time employment when applying for a permanent residence permit

Supplementary requirement – 4 years’ employment

You can meet one of the four supplementary requirements if you have worked for 4 years during the past 4 years and 6 months.

Read more about the supplementary work requirement
 

Supplementary requirements

In order to qualify for a permanent residence permit, you need to meet at least 2 of 4 supplementary requirements. If you meet all 4 supplementary requirements, you will qualify for a permanent residence permit after 4 years of legal residence in Denmark, instead of the normal 8. 

You can meet one of the supplementary requirements by passing the Danish language test 3 (Prøve i Dansk 3), or a Danish exam of an equivalent or higher level.

List of Danish language tests that are equivalent to or higher than the Danish language test 3:

  • Danish language test 3 (Prøve i Dansk 3) with a grade average of at least 6 (on the Danish 13 point grading scale) or 02 (on the Danish 7 point grading scale).
  • The study test called studieprøven with a grade average of at least 6 (on the Danish 13 point grading scale) or 02 (on the Danish 7 point grading scale) in each of the four tests. 
  • 9th or 10th grade final exams with a grade average of at least 6 (on the Danish 13 point grading scale) or 02 (on the Danish 7 point grading scale) in the Danish disciplines, except for conduct.
  • Proof of passed Danish ‘gymnasium’ final exams (STX, HF, HHX, HTX) or a minimum requirement for entrance exam in connection with a vocational program (eux).
  • Proof of passed General Preparatory Examination (almen forberedelsesekamen – avu). 
  • Test diploma for passed single subjects in Danish or Danish as a second language with a passed test in at least one Danish discipline/subject area between the levels G-A and with a grade average of at least 6 (on the Danish 13 point grading scale) or 02 (on the Danish 7 point grading scale) from e.g. one of the following educations: stx, hf, hhx, htx, eux, eud or avu.
  • Passed FVU-reading level 4.
  • Proof of passed International Baccalaureate (IB) with Danish on an A or B level.
  • The Danish language test 3 at the study school in Copenhagen.
  • Proof of following a higher educational program at a university, university college (e.g. business school, nursing college or teacher training college) etc., unless the program was not taken in Danish.

The tests on this list all have a higher level than Prøve i Dansk 2. If you pass one of the exams listed above, you will satisfy both a supplementary requirement for qualifying for a permanent residence permit, as well as the basic requirement that you pass Prøve i Dansk 2, or a Danish exam of an equivalent or higher level.

You can meet one of the 4 supplementary requirements by having regular, full-time employment or being self-employed in Denmark for at least 4 years during the 4 years and 6 months prior to the date the Immigration Service reaches a decision about your application for a permanent residence permit.

This means that during the past 4 years and 6 months you need to have had a regular, full-time employment for a total 4 years or more. You do not have to have been continuously employed for 4 years. You could, for example, have worked full-time for 2 years, been unemployed for 6 months, and then worked full-time again for 2 years.

Read more about which types of employment can be considered regular, full-time employment when applying for a permanent residence permit

You can meet1 of the 4 supplementary requirements by passing the active citizen exam or having displayed active citizenship in Denmark for at least a year by doing things like serving on a board or being a member of an association. 

The active citizen exam

The active citizen exam is a new written exam, which is held twice a year – in June and in December. The exam is held by a number of language schools across the country.

The active citizen exam is a new exam. Citizen exams that are passed before 2016 do not count as meeting the supplementary requirement concerning active citizen.

Registration and date of exam

At the Ministry of Immigration and Integration’s webpage (uim.dk), you can read about how to register for the active citizen exam and about the exam. You can also see the date of the next exam and the registration deadline.

Read more about registration and the exam (in Danish only)

Preparation for the exam

The active citizen exam is designed as a multiple choice test and contains 25 questions about the Danish democracy and everyday life as well as Danish culture and history.Study material can be found at the Ministry of Immigration and Integration’s webpage (uim.dk)

Find the study material for the active citizen exam (in Danish only)

Active citizenship

You can meet the supplementary requirement concerning active citizen if you can document that you have exhibited active citizenship in Denmark for at least 1 year. This can be by participation in a board, organization or similar. It is a requirement that that it is a board, organization or similar that in word and deed supports the fundamental democratic values and legal principals in the Danish society.

It is not a requirement that you have participated in an organization or board continuously throughout a whole year. This means that you can combine more years of active citizenship to meet the requirement concerning 1 year of active citizenship. Furthermore, it is not a requirement that you still participate in an organization or board at the time when the permanent residence permit is being ruled. Finally, it is not a requirement that you have been a member of the same organization, board or similar throughout the 1 year.

Membership of a parents’ committee, a school board, a board of a non-profit housing organization, an integration council or a senior council

You will be able to meet the requirement concerning active citizenship by e.g. being a member of a parents’ committee, a school board, a board of a non-profit housing organization, an integration council or a senior council for at least 1 year.

You can document a membership of a parents’ committee by e.g. enclosing a statement from the day-care center, the municipal day-care, the after-school center or the after-school club.

Membership of a school board or a board of a non-profit housing organization can be documented by e.g. enclosing a statement from the school or the housing organization.

Membership of an integration council or a senior council can be documented by e.g. enclosing a statement from the municipal council who has established the council.

Participation in work for children or young people

You can also meet the requirement by having exhibited active citizenship through at least 1 year of participation in work for children or young people e.g. by being a trainer in a sports club or by completing a referee or trainer education. The same applies when participating in a folk high school (højskole) stay, work as a role model or involvement in other organized spare-time activities for children or young people, e.g. help with homework.

You can document the participation by e.g. enclosing a statement from the club, organization or similar where you have worked. Or you can do so by enclosing documentation of completed referee or trainer education including the length of the education or by enclosing proof of participation in a folk high school (højskole) stay.

Participation in a non-profit organization

You can also meet the requirement concerning active citizenship through at least 1 year of participation in a non-profit organization, e.g. if you have participated actively in the management of an organization. The non-profit organization can e.g. be an organization that is entitled to subsidies under the Non-formal Education Act (folkeoplysningsloven).

If you have a residence permit on the grounds of work or as a religious worker, be aware that you may need a separate permit for volunteering beside your current temporary residence permit.

        

You can meet 1 of the 4 supplementary requirements by having an annual taxable income of DKK 286,526.16 (2019 level) or more for the 2 years prior to the Immigration Service reaching a decision about your application for a permanent residence permit.

The types of taxable income listed below can be included when calculating whether your annual taxable income has averaged DKK 286,526.16 (2019 level) or more.

  • Income taxed at source (A-indkomst)
  • Income not taxed at source (B-indkomst)
  • Wages paid as subsistence allowance, including food and lodging
  • Payment of labour-market pension (arbejdsmarkedspension)
  • Wages paid abroad, if the wage would have been taxable in Denmark

Income earned abroad

If you worked abroad for your Danish employer or were deployed, and the money you earned while abroad is taxable in Denmark, it can be counted towards the requirement.

If you are subject to Danish taxation but earned income abroad and paid taxes where it was earned, the income can be counted towards the requirement if SKAT determines that the income would have been taxable in Denmark, had the work been carried out in Denmark.

If, while residing abroad, a part of your income was paid as a subsistence allowance, including food and lodging, it can also count towards the requirement.

If you earned income abroad during the two years prior to the Immigration Service reaching a decision about your application for a permanent residence permit, you need to obtain a declaration from SKAT verifying that the income would have been taxable in Denmark if the work had been carried out in Denmark.
 

Who can be granted an exemption from the requirements?

To the extent that Denmark’s international obligations, including the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, require it, the Immigration Service grants exemptions from (that is to say, you will not need to meet) one or more of the requirements for a permanent residence permit.

The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities defines a person with a disability as someone who has “long-term physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments which in interaction with various barriers may hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others”.

Exemption from the basic requirements

If you have a disability that prevents you from meeting one or more of the basic requirements for a permanent residence permit, you will be exempt from meeting these requirements, if the UN Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities dictates it. You can only be granted an exemption from requirements your disability prevents you from meeting.

Regardless of the nature of your disability, you cannot be granted an exemption from the following requirements:

  • You need to have a valid residence permit
  • You need to be over 18
  • You need to have been a legal resident of Denmark for eight years or more (in certain cases four)
  • You may not have been convicted of certain types of crimes.

Exemption from the supplementary requirements

If you do not meet one or more of the supplementary requirements due to a disability, as defined by the UN Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities, you will be credited with meeting the requirement (or requirements) in question.

This means that if you cannot meet one of the four supplementary requirements due to your disability, you only need to meet one of the other supplementary requirements.

If you cannot meet two of the supplementary requirements due to your disability, the two requirements will be considered met, and you will not have to meet any of the other supplementary requirements.

If you are a pensioner, or if you have been granted an early-age pension, you are exempt from (that is to say, you do not have to meet) the basic requirement that you have had regular, full-time employment for at least three years and six months during the past four years.

You are also exempt from the basic requirement that you are employed at the time the Immigration Service issues a decision about your application for a permanent residence permit.

Likewise, you are exempt from the supplementary requirements that you have had regular, full-time employment for at least four years during the past four years and six months, and that your annual taxable income during the past two years has averaged DKK 286,526.16 (2019 level) or more.

If you, as a pensioner or an early-aged pensioner, meet one of the other supplementary requirements (active citizenship or Prøve i Dansk 3) you can be granted a permanent residence permit after eight years of legal residence in Denmark.

If you, as a pensioner or an early-age pensioner, meet the active citizenship requirement and the Prøve i Dansk 3 requirement, you can be granted a permanent residence permit after four years of legal residence in Denmark.

When can you apply for a permanent residence permit?

You can apply for a permanent residence permit at any time. You do not need to wait until your residence permit is about to expire. However, it is important that you submit your application before your current residence permit expires.

If you do not meet all the requirements for a permanent residence permit, you can apply for an extension of your current residence permit instead. If you apply for an extension, you can apply three months prior to the date your current residence permit expires. Read more about extensions of residence permits

If you have a residence permit on the grounds of work or study

If you have a residence permit on the grounds of work or study, you must submit an application for an extension of your current residence permit, or a new application for a temporary residence permit, together with your application for a permanent residence permit. You must do this even though your temporary residence permit is not about to expire. If you submit an application to extend a temporary residence permit, use the form that corresponds to your current grounds for residence. If you are applying for a new residence permit, use the form that corresponds to your grounds for applying. Read more about extending temporary residence permits

When processing your application, the Immigration Service will ask the Agency for International Recruitment and Integration about your grounds for residence.

If you do not apply in time

If you submit your application for a permanent residence permit or for an extension of your current residence permit, after your current residence permit expires, the application is submitted to late, and you will be in Denmark illegally. The Immigration Service will likely reject your application, regardless of how briefly you are in Denmark after it expires. The Immigration Service will only process applications that are submitted late if Denmark’s international obligations require it to do so.

If your application is rejected, you will normally need to leave Denmark. If you would like to continue residing in Denmark you will need to apply for a new residence permit. Applications for a new residence permit will be reviewed based on the current rules. You will not be able to apply to have your expired residence permit extended.

If you are staying in Denmark illegally, you risk being reported to the police. You also risk being deported and temporarily banned from entering Denmark or any other EU or Schengen country.

Collateral requirement

If you were granted a residence permit on the grounds of family reunification, your spouse/partner most likely had to post collateral in the form a financial guarantee.

In order for the Immigration Service to be able to extend your temporary residence permit, your spouse/partner needs to renew the original collateral guarantee or post a new guarantee. Read more about renewing a collateral guarantee when applying to extend a temporary residence permit

If you are granted a permanent residence permit, your spouse will no longer need to post a financial guarantee and any funds held by your municipality as collateral will be returned. All inquiries about returning collateral should be directed to the municipality where you live.

The information below explains how to apply for a permanent residence permit. The instructions in steps 4, 5 and 6 each apply to different grounds for residence.

We recommend that you make sure you know the requirements for obtaining a permanent residence permit before paying the application fee. Read more about the requirements in the ‘Need to know’ tab.

 

When submitting an application or appeal with a fee, you must first create a case order ID.

Fee:

DKK 4,930,-

DKK 4,930,-

DKK 4,930,-

DKK 6,960,-

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Are you sure a fee is not required to be paid in your case?

Only certain applicants are exempt from paying a fee. If the immigration authorities decide at a later stage that the applicant/appelant is not exempt from paying a fee, the application/appeal will be rejected.
If you have paid a fee and the following case handling shows that the fee should not have been paid, the whole fee will be refunded.

In certain cases the fee is not warranted (fee exemption). Examples are:

  • The Association Agreement between the EU and Turkey
  • Denmark’s international obligations
  • Citizenship of the EU/EEA

You are still required to create a case order ID, even if you are not required to pay a fee.

If you have paid a fee and it is not warranted, the whole fee will be refunded.

Read more about Fee exemption

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All fees are regulated every year on 1 January. Make sure to create your Case Order ID, pay the fee and submit your application in the same calendar year. If you pay the fee before 1 January and submit your application after 1 January, your application may be rejected.

If no case order ID is shown in the field below, please type your case order ID and click on View payment status.

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This page tells you which information is required when paying the fee online using a Danish internet bank.

Pay using Danish internet bank

Please include the following information when paying the fee online using a Danish internet bank.

Order payment form and pay fee at a post office or in a bank

Order payment form

On this page you can order a payment form which you can use to pay the fee at a post office or in a bank. 

The payment form will be sent to the address you give below. 

You need to enclose documentation with your application, so it is a good idea to gather it all before you start.  

You may need:

Set aside

40 to 50 minutes

to fill in the application form.

2 persons

You and your spouse/partner each need to fill in part of the application form.

The application form includes detailed instructions for how to fill it in and which types of documentation you need to enclose. The application is only available in Danish.

You need a NemID code card when filling in the application form. Read more about NemID

If you want to resume filling in an application form online select ‘Start online application’. Once you are logged in, select ‘Continue a previously saved application’.

If you would like to make changes to an application after you have submitted it, you need to contact the Immigration Service. You do not need to submit a new application. Contact the Immigration Service

Start TU1-4 online application

When you apply for a permanent residence permit, you are required to use the online application form TU1-4, unless you are exempt from this requirement. Read more about mandatory online self-service

When you submit an application to the Immigration Service, we will process your personal information. You can read more about your rights and how we process your information on this page: Personal data – How we process your data

When processing your case, we may seek to verify the accuracy of the information you have given. Read more about verification at the Danish Immigration Service

Set aside

30 to 40 minutes

to fill in the application form.

1 person

You, the applicant, need to fill in the application form.

The application form includes detailed instructions for how to fill it in and which types of documentation you need to enclose. The application is only available in Danish.

You can read more about how we process your personal data here.

You need a NemID code card when filling in the application form. Read more about NemID

If you want to resume filling in an application form on-line select ‘Start on-line application’. Once you are logged in, select ‘Continue a previously saved application’.

If you would like to make changes to an application after you have submitted it, you need to contact the Immigration Service. You do not need to submit a new application. Contact the Immigration Service

Start TU1-4 online application

If you are applying for a permanent residence permit, you are required to use the online version of application form TU1-4, unless you have been granted an exemption. Read more about mandatory online self-service 

When you submit an application to the Immigration Service, we will process your personal information. You can read more about your rights and how we process your information on this page: Personal data – How we process your data

 

Set aside

30 to 40 minutes

 to fill in the application form.

1 person

You, the applicant, needs to fill in the application form.

The application form includes detailed instructions for how to fill it in and which types of documentation you need to enclose. The application is only available in Danish.

You need a NemID code card when filling in the application form. Read more about NemID

If you want to resume filling in an application form online select ‘Start online application’. Once you are logged in, select ‘Continue a previously saved application’.

If you would like to make changes to an online application after you have submitted it, you need to contact the Immigration Service. You do not need to submit a new application. Contact the Immigration Service

Start TU1-4 online application

 

You are required to use the online self-service form TU1-4 when applying for a permanent residence permit, unless you are exempt from this requirement. Read more about mandatory online self-service

Fill in an application for temporary extension

If your residence is based on work or study and you are applying for a permanent residence permit, you will also need to apply to extend your current temporary residence permit. Use the application form that corresponds to your current grounds for residence. Read more about extending temporary residence permits

Your grounds for residence were indicated in the letter you received from the Immigration Service or SIRI that accompanied your most recent residence permit.

When you submit an application to the Immigration Service, we will process your personal information. You can read more about your rights and how we process your information on this page: Personal data – How we process your data

 

When you submit your application, you will normally need to provide us with your fingerprints and a picture of your face (biometric features) within 14 days. Your biometric features are required in order for you to get a new residence card.

You can have your biometric features recorded at the Immigration Service’s Citizen Service. If you live outside Greater Copenhagen, you can also have your biometric features recorded at certain police stations. See the list of police stations capable of recording biometric features 

Read more about residence cards with fingerprints and facial pictures
 

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